Democracy?

I’ve previously written about stolen elections. The first election I voted in, 2000, happened to be the most blatant stolen election in US history. It went to the highest levels of power, involving a pivotal state governed by the brother of a major candidate and a partisan Supreme Court that decided to bypass democracy itself in order to declare the new ruler.

I don’t know what to make of it all. It really is messed up. Just another thing to make me despair. And heading into the new century was a time of my life when I didn’t need more despair.

It was my mid-twenties. Depression had hit me like a ton of bricks starting in my late teens. Leaving home for the first time, I was a lost cause and a lost soul. I dropped out of college and wandered aimlessly for a number of years, having endlessly contemplated suicide and one time attempted it. I eventually settled down, having permanently returned to my childhood home. At that point, I was in a slightly better frame of mind.

The turn of the century got everyone excited, with threats of the Y2K bug. It was a new century and a new millennium. We survived that with a sigh of relief, but the worst was yet to come. The coming decade of the aughts would not be a happy time. Even so, many looked to the new millennium with optimism, the Cold War having ended more than a decade before and the intervening years having seen a tech boom. The threat of terrorists and economic recessions weren’t yet on many people’s minds. The future seemed bright and ripe for change.

I remember that moment in time. I heard Nader give a speech on his presidential campaign. He gave me hope, as naive as that may sound. I can’t explain what an amazing thing hope can be when it has been lost for so long. Listening to Nader, it was beyond refreshing. It was inspiring. He was a politician who actually gave a damn. And the cynical partisan Democrats attacked the likes of me for voting my conscience, a silly thing to do considering that I wasn’t a Democrat and neither were most of Nader’s supporters, but that is always how partisan politics trumps all else, even democracy itself.

Following the Florida fiasco, the strangest thing in the world happened. Democrats rationalized it away, as their candidate rolled over and played dead (Kerry in 2004 followed Gore’s example, handing Bush a second term). The fullest recounts ever done showed that Gore won Florida (even more troubling developments happened in 2004), but no one wanted to know, especially not Democrats. To know the truth would mean having to admit the dark reality before us. And here we are still afraid of the truth.

Maybe there were good reasons for that fear. The powers that be were nothing to sniff at. I was reminded of this in coming across Clint Curtis’ allegations about vote rigging. What really caught my attention was the ‘suicide’ of an investigator, Raymond Lemme, who supposedly was about to bring info out to the public. There was also the suspicious death of a high-level Republican consultant, Michael Connell, after having been subpoenaed in a vote rigging investigation.

I don’t know what to do with this kind of thing. To most people, this is the territory of conspiracy theorists, ya know crazy paranoiacs. It should, therefore, be dismissed from thought and banished from public debate. The problem is that I’m psychologically incapable of ignoring inconvenient and uncomfortable facts. Call it depressive realism. I just can’t turn away, as if it doesn’t matter.

The whole thing is highly plausible, even though proving specific connections is difficult. I do know that a lot of unusual activity happened in the 2000 and 2004 elections. All of this comes back to mind during this campaign season, watching all the strange things going on with the Democratic caucuses and primaries: voters being purged, voter status being mysteriously switched, exit polls not matching voting results, etc.

The failure of our system isn’t necessarily what can be proved. Rather, it’s what can’t be proved that is problematic. Our present system is designed to lack transparency and accountability, to leave few if any paper trails and any other traceable evidence. I’d be glad if we could simply verify nothing illegal or immoral happened, nothing anti-democratic was involved, but that is precisely what we can’t do. The one thing democracy can’t overcome is secrecy, as that makes corruption inevitable.

I can’t help thinking that future generations will remember the beginning of this century as one of the darkest times in American history. It will be known as the era when the enemy within became more dangerous than any foreign power.

If you are one of the rare courageous individuals who wants to know what is going on in the world, then read Democracy Undone by Dale Tavris or one of the many other books about the topic. Or if you’d rather not read an entire book, you can find some info in the videos and links below. Your mind will be blown, your heart broken, and your sense of justice outraged—the proper attitude of any freedom-loving American.

This leaves us all with one question: If we don’t have a functioning democracy, what kind of country is this? Don’t just pass over that question. Let it sink in. Let yourself feel despair, to mourn what has been lost. Stop for a moment and consider what this all means. Look at what is before you with eyes wide open.

* * *

Did Expert Witness, Activists Thwart a Rove Ohio Vote Plot?
by Andrew Kreig

Who’s Stealing Your Vote? A Documentary
by John Wellington Ennis

How to Rig an Election
by Victoria Collier

How the GOP Wired Ohio’s 2004 Vote Count for Bush to Win
by Steven Rosenfeld

New Court Filing Reveals How the 2004 Ohio Presidential Election Was Hacked
by Bob Fritakis

New Evidence Of Vote Hacking Emerges In Ohio 2004 General Election Lawsuit
by Karoli Kuns

Why Was Uncertified ‘Experimental’ Software Installed on ES&S Tabulation Systems in 39 OH Counties Just Days Before Presidential Election?
By Brad Friedman

 

Clint Curtis
Wikipedia

Tom Feeney: Clint Curtis and vote fraud
SourceWatch

Michael Connell
Wikipedia

Mike Connell
SourceWatch

Programmers weigh in on vote-rigging idea, some details confirmed
by John Byrne

Death of Democracy
by Brad Friedman

Clint Curtis Investigator’s ‘Suicide’ Case Reopened By Georgia Police!
by Brad Friedman

The ghost of rigged elections past: New revelations on the death of Michael Connell
by Bob Fitrakis

These People Kill People You Know
by zapdam

Suspicious Deaths of Those Who Knew Too Much Under Bush’s Watch
by Diana Lee

You will know them by the trail of dead
Xymphora

Investigator’s Murder Cover-Up Straw That Broke Plot
by John Caylor

Global Eye
By Chris Floyd

 

 

 

The Complicity of Mainstream Politics and Media

Sandra Day O’Connor has been in the news about her stated doubts about the 2000 Bush v. Gore decision. I don’t feel like offering an analysis of something that has already been analyzed to death. The facts are obvious, if one cares to look.

I’ll simply point out three issues.

First, there is the recount issue. The recount was stopped by the Supreme Court, but that was just one problem among many. Even Gore wasn’t demanding a full recount nor did he fight the Supreme Court decision. What did Gore gain by taking a dive?

Studies show a state-wide full recount would have shown Gore to be the winner of Florida and so the winner of the presidential election. The popular vote doesn’t necessarily win elections because of how our system operates. Nonetheless, Gore won the popular vote both in Florida and across the nation.

I say this as someone who voted for Nader and generally can’t stand the Democratic Party, Gore included. It is ultimately Gore’s fault. If he had demanded a full recount, he’d at least not be complicit in the undermining of American democracy.

Second, the media played a massive role in the entire incident.

The MSM called it for Gore which probably impacted those who were deciding at the last minute whether to vote or not. More importantly, like Gore, the MSM didn’t do much to challenge the belief that Bush won. They often pushed hard for the assumption that a full recount wouldn’t have mattered.

This all demonstrates the corruption and/or failure of the entire system. Complicity in the stolen election involved the MSM along with both parties, the Supreme Court, Congress and the local Florida officials. Such a massive failure of the system won’t recover easily. When democracy fails in a democracy, what is the next step? When a democracy demonstrates it has become a Banana Republic, what then? Revolution?

Third, a Harris poll done back in 2000 gave some very surprising results.

The first question was: “If everyone who tried to vote in Florida had their votes counted for the candidate who they thought they were voting for — with no misleading  ballots and infallible voting machines — who do you think would have  won the election, George W. Bush or Al Gore?” Only 40% thought Bush would have won and 49% thought Gore would have won. Even more bizarre, almost 25%(1 in 5) Republicans either thought Gore won or chose ‘Not sure/Refused’ as their answer; and of that 25%, there were specifically 11% (more than 1 in 10) Republicans who thought Gore won.

If that poll wasn’t just a fluke, the results are amazing. The very careful wording of the question might be a key element. The question made clear that it was asking in terms of democracy actually functioning and in terms of a state-wide full recount.

http://prospect.org/article/thanks-nothing-sandra-day-oconnor

http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2000/12/24/the-truth-behind-the-pillars.html

http://www.alternet.org/justice-sandra-day-oconnor-maybe-bush-v-gore-wasnt-best-decision

http://fair.org/extra-online-articles/who-won-the-election-who-cares/

http://www.consortiumnews.com/2001/111201a.html

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/kausfiles_special/2001/11/update_hotrecount_docs.single.html

http://www.commondreams.org/headlines01/0127-01.htm

http://archive.democrats.com/display.cfm?id=181

http://imai.princeton.edu/research/ballots.html

http://www.pollingreport.com/wh2post.htm