Instant Carb Addiction

There are isolated hunter-gatherer tribes, the Toulambi of Papua New Guinea, in a region that saw few Westerners. The filmmaker Jean-Pierre Dutilleux, for some reason, was in a situation that brought him and his camera man into the territory of these reclusive people. Waiting at the edge of a stream, the tribal men come out to meet the white strangers in what was claimed to have been first contact.

After a period of cautious inspections of the visitors, they invited the two white men back to their camp. They were offered modern agricultural food. One tribal guy tries some white rice and initially rejects it with a shocked response, but after a second bite he decides it is good. The whole tribe joins the feast and quite possibly this is their first experience of refined starchy carbs. And going by how they quickly devour the pot of white rice, it appears they really really like this strange new delicacy!

This is an example of an event that has happened a million times before. This is how agriculturalists came to dominate the world. These tribal people will now crave these agricultural food staples. After a generation or so of trade, poaching on their hunting grounds, environmental loss, and maybe eventual confinement to a reservation, they eventually will become entirely dependent on this addictive food source. And their health will start to noticeably decline, as Gary Taubes describes what happened to the Pima (chp. 14, Good Calories, Bad Calories).

This is called the civilizing process. Addiction is the foundation of civilization. And from it forms the agricultural mind.

As a side note, there appears to have been some controversy about this film. But in the end, there is no particular reason to doubt its veracity. There is nothing about the behavior of any of the people in the film that indicates acting or inauthenticity. Everyone making such claims were not present. What is known is that there were multiple isolated tribes in this area and contact happened a few times over the past century. But that in no way suggests that this particular group had ever met outsiders. The experience of eating white rice seems to show a genuine surprise at a food they’d never tasted before.

Jean-Pierre Dutilleux: Controversies (Wikipedia)

“In one of his films dedicated to the Toulambi tribe of Papua New Guinea, Dutilleux believes his film footage includes this tribe’s first encounter with modern white men, and poses the possibility this may be the last time in history this can occur. A video of this film has been extensively posted in the internet, prompting much discussion and questions about this claim.[19] According to an article in the peer-reviewed Journal of Pacific History, the colonial archives indicate that the territory of the Toulambis had been visited by at least six patrols between 1929 and 1972. In itself that is very few and Dutilleaux may be quite correct as certainly seems to be so when viewing the film.[20]”

[19] @truth. “Footage: Uncontacted tribe meets outsiders and sees modern technology for the first time? The debate goes on…” http://www.minds.com. Retrieved 14 July 2019.
[20] Lemonnier, Pierre (2004). “The Hunt for Authenticity: Stone Age Stories Out of Context”. Journal of Pacific History. 39 (1): 79–98. doi:10.1080/00223340410001684868.

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Sugar is an addictive drug. Of course, starchy carbohydrates aren’t the same as sugar, but it’s basically the same as the former quickly turns into the latter. Keep in mind that pure sugar is what they give to male infants to numb the pain during circumcision. Below are videos of babies experiencing sweetness for the first time:

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And for your amusement:

“Oatmeal. How are we doing on oatmeal?”
“Let’s check.”
*Opens cupboard filled with bags of oatmeal*
“Okay. We have a couple weeks worth.”

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